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Keynotes

David Anderson, Father of Software Kanban: Monday 13:45

Kent Beck, Founder of XP: Monday 17:30

John Seddon, Expert for Lean Service Organisations: Tuesday 09:15

Stephen Bungay, Specialist for Strategy, Organisation and Leadership: Tuesday 16:15

Sessions

A Fool with a Tool is still a Fool - Introducing Kanban, but do it right!

Kanban is an evolutionary change management method which leads teams/companies to a Kaizen culture of continuous improvement. The evolutionary approach overcomes the inevitable resistance to change and reduces the fear of the persons involved. The Kanban mechanics help to solve problems and encourage people to continuously improve their work processes until optimization is part of their everyday work. Welcome to the wonderland of Kanban and Kaizen! So much for the theory! The reality, however, is quite different. In my talk I will share my observations and experiences with Kanban change initiatives. I will talk about change approaches that do not work and I will come up with some examples that seem to work very well. If you are in the lucky position that you are working with highly motivated teams in which everybody lives the principles of Kanban in every second of their (work) life then you should probably listen to another presentation. However, if you find characters in your team like e.g. a husband and father who is afraid to lose his job, and a young graduate who doesn't seem to care about your fancy sticky notes, and an experienced engineer who thinks this Kanban thing could maybe work out in the end, etc. you will probably gain some insights into successfully performing an evolutionary change initiative with Kanban.

Speaker: Klaus Leopold

Kind: Experience Report

Timeslot: Tuesday, 14:15

Level: Basic

 

A Kanban Primer

In the form of an improvised theatre play, we'd like to introduce the basics of Kanban for the few newbies in the auditorium in the beginning of the conference.

We will cove board build up, changing of the process shown on the board, issues w/expedite lanes, Pull-principle, WiP-Limits, temporarily available resources, issues w/ expert knowledge, operations Review.

The format is very open through the improvisation, so that we can at all times change the completely course of the play depending on the audiences demand. basically we will set up a Meta Kanban driven by the audience.

Speakers: Markus Andrezak, Arne Roock, Bernd Schiffer

Kind: Session

Timeslot: Monday, 10:15

Level: Basic


Advanced Task Board Designs

As we move beyond small projects with single teams, or teams that focus only on one type of work, our value streams get more complex. How do we successfully implement visual management in these scenarios? In this session, we will discuss and present strategies for dealing with this complexity. These strategies may vary from attempting to visualize and manage different types of work using elaborate taskboards, to improving the visualization of our value streams by modeling complex situations in simple but effective ways.

Speaker: Xavier Quesada Allue

Kind: Session

Timeslot: Monday, 16:45

Level: Intermediate

 

Beyond Kanban: A Lean Systems Approach

Kanban scheduling in software development represents a great advance over fixed-iteration approaches such as Scrum. However, implementations still face barriers because they are primarily focused on individual teams and not well connected with organizational performance as a whole. Kanban also represents a small subset of the greater promise of Lean. That that promise is to create a learning organization in which employees grow and prosper as part of a process of relentless improvement in the way we deliver customer and shareholder value.

In this talk we will present an extended version of the Lean Management vision, based on Systems Thinking, which incorporates a framework for breakthrough improvements (Kaikaku) as well as continuous improvement (Kaizen). The framework presented goes beyond inventory and activity management and incorporates five dimensions of mapping and improving work – value stream, information, organization, product, and social architecture. The LSI 5D framework has been used to create quantifiable results with a variety of business models and settings, including Aerospace & Defense, Medical Devices, and Game Development.

To ensure that Lean delivers quantifiable business value, we must understand how to best leverage it with our business model and the organization’s developmental stage. We will discuss how this is done in practice, linking value streams to business models and financial outcomes.

Speaker: Eilif Monrad-Krohn

Kind: Session

Timeslot: Tuesday, 15:00

Level: Intermediate

 

Build It and They Will Come

This presentation is based on a real life case study of an Internet Video startup, with a very strong innovative product offering, who used Agile and Kanban methods to deliver a set of ideas originated on the back of an envelope to a fully live .com in less than 6 months.
The delivery team used a combination of Scrum, XP and Kanban to meet a fixed delivery date constraint; launch at the MIP TV event in Cannes.

Speaker: David Joyce

Kind: Session

Timeslot: Tuesday, 13:45

Level: Basic

 

Complexity Thinking? Or Systems Thinking++ ?

People have been using the term Systems Thinking for a few decades. But nowadays we sometimes hear the term Complexity Thinking. Some claim that comparing complexity thinking to systems thinking is like comparing Einsteinian physics to Newtonian physics. Others claim that complexity thinking is nothing more than systems thinking in a fashionable jacket. What are the differences? Are there any? And what does this all have to do with Lean and Agile software development? Do such theoretical debates on terminology really help us to better manage our business?

Speaker: Jurgen Appelo

Kind: Session

Timeslot: Tuesday, 15:00

Level: Intermediate

 

Development Process @ Prezi

Prezi is a cloud-based zooming presentation editor, the company is based in Budapest and San Francisco.

In 2011 we adopted lean development process with continuous integration/deployment and kanban boards. We have 15 developers in several teams. Using this new methodology, we managed to release the same amount of code within the last 3 months, as we did during the 2 years before that.

In this case study we would like to show how we put together the whole production system from both a project management and a development perspective.

Session outline:

1) Overview/Intro (about the company, cooperation between the offices)

2) The days before kanban

3) Evolution of the kanban boards

4) Continuous integration (how to improve test coverage dramatically without stopping the production)

5) Continuous deployment with feature switches

Kalman Kemenczy is kanbanmonkey at Prezi, and Szilveszter Farkas is a senior web engineer.

Speakers:  Kalman Kemenczy, Szilveszter Farkas

Kind: Experience Report

Timeslot: Monday, 10:15

Level: Basic


End to End Kanban - A Practical Report

As a full-service online-agency e-netconsulting KG ist specialized in technically sophisticated web- and mobile-solutions. Aiming for improvement of internal processes Kanban soon appeared as a suitable method. Kanban enables us to model the entire value-added-chain . Focussing on software-development led to high response time regarding inquiries and often did we not go the whole distance, i.e. documentation and similar tasks remained incomplete.

And off course we want to improve our specific process of development. Due to the fact that agencies of e-netconsulting's size face a challenge in multi-project-management most develpoment-methods such as Scrum are not appropriate. Concerning this aspect Kanban was able meet our expectations.

As a conclusion we can state that a combination of miscellanious classical means of Kanban (e.g. column WIPs, personal WIPs, visualizing the workflow, explicit rules) supplemented by specific company solutions (e.g. variational units of WIP limits, two independent while still combined boards) improved processes within e-netconsulting after two months already. But still we continue. I would like to explain our way, focused on our specific company solutions, in my speech.

Speaker: Volker Graubaum

Kind: Experience Report

Timeslot: Monday, 10:45

Level: Beginner

 

Ericsson Finland Agile and Lean transformation, Experiences and Learnings

Ericsson Finland started large scale Agile transformation 2008. In my presentation I will explain how we changed a traditional silo-based R&D center towards a Lean and Agile software development R&D Organization. We realized early that this is a profound transformation of the way of working, the organization, our physical seating arrangements, our culture and our competence profile. This is reflected throughout the presentation and opened up with real-life examples and thinking.

Main topic for the presentation is Change in aspects of Leadership, Lean Thinking, Continuous Learning and Organizational Changes. I will go through how we have put in place our implementation in regards of Cross-Functional Teams, Product Ownership, Line Management and Agile Testing.

Our Experiences and Learnings are reflected in the presentation and special attention is put into Self Organization and Governance. We also want to share how we think when reflecting by-the-book theories and how they are applied in our context.

Speaker: Henri Kivioja

Kind: Experience Report

Timeslot: Tuesday, 13:45

Level: Basic



Getting to one button deploy using Kanban

This presentation recounts the story of the evolution of the Corbis <http://www.corbis.com> codebase, build and deployment approach and how Kanban affected the culture that led to significant improvements. It’s interesting because of the unintentional consequences the Configuration Management (Devops) team enjoyed being on the periphery of the development team implementing Kanban.

  • The transition from manually triggered builds to Continuous Integration.
  • The case for doing away with the three day post production freeze.
  • Codeline strategy - going from 6 branches to 2 branches.
  • Weekend and holiday work reduced
  • Dude, It’s really not a configuration issue – How transparency changed mindsets.
  • So – just when can we upgrade SQLServer on the DB servers?
  • From constant trouble shooting to actually having time to make improvements.

Speaker: Dominica DeGrandis

Kind: Session

Timeslot: Tuesday, 10:15

Level: Intermediate

 

Growing Pains and Remedies: Using Kanban to affect and embrace change from R&D to production

This is the story of adopting Kanban to scratch an itch on a small R&D project. Both the project and our Kanban adoption grew and grew. The project is now a high profile company. Kanban now enables our delivery of production software from initial idea to deployment. It is a story of the change that came with this growth and of the changes that came from us using Kanban.

It is as much about the human issues of introducing change as those related to method and process. The presentation will contain examples, data and stories from the project.

Speakers: Dan Brown, Chris Young

Kind: Experience Report

Timeslot: Tuesday, 10:15

Level: Basic

 

Healthy Projects

A healthy project requires clarity of project (what are we building), the customer (for whom are we building), the purpose (why are we building it), and of release schedules (when are we building it). But it doesn't stop there, a healthy project requires a collaborative contract and structure, an understanding of what quality means, constant communication between the team and all other stakeholders, and an appreciation of the project's trajectory. Agile and lean give us a highly configurable (and re-configurable) toolkit with which to build healthy projects. Jim Benson will discuss healthy projects with very different management structures and processes to illustrate that process is only healthy if it results in satisfied stakeholders.

Speaker: Jim Benson

Kind: Session

Timeslot: Tuesday, 10:15

Level: Intermediate

 

How Agile and Lean changed my Organization

I work for it-agile almost from the beginning of that company, since 2005. We are a middle-sized organization of coaches, consultants and developers - and we see ourselves Agile and Lean through and through, to the core, dyed-in-the-wool, born-and-bread.

Well, to be honest, we might be not. Or at least not from the beginning. Over the years, we learned a lot:

  • How to have self-organizing teams
  • How to manage our acquisitions and changes with Kanban boards
  • How to improve our communication with social media
  • How to distribute power and responsibility in a company owned by their employees

And we're not done learning yet. This session is a snapshot of where we are, how we got there, and what issues we're facing right now.

Speaker: Bernd Schiffer

Kind: Experience Report

Timeslot: Tuesday, 15:30

Level: Basic

 

How do you always run a changing system?

The conference tag line, "Always running a changing system", reminds us that we should be continuously evolving and improving the way that we work. This session will be a kanban konversation, a pull-based variation of the goldfish bowl format, in which participants can share and discuss stories how how they have created a kaizen culture.

Facilitator: Karl Scotland

Kind: Discussion

Timeslot: Tuesday, 13:45

Level: Basic

 

Igniting change in 20 teams within 6 months – an experience report from Sandvik IT Services

About 20 development teams at Sandvik IT Services have quickly taken control over what they do and how they do it, with help from Kanban. These teams have already experienced a lot of benefits and are now slowly moving towards continuous improvement. More teams are standing in line to start their journey! The change is no longer limited to development teams but also starts to attract management and business teams.

In this experience report, participants will understand what we did to make change happen in the organization, how we ensured that change occured in the right direction, what organizational effects it generated and what our next steps are.

Specific areas that we will cover are:

• The Supporting office, mandate without commitment

• The power of visualization, creating the desire for change

• The value of targeting middle-management

• Helping many teams change versus focusing on a few

• Development process, a tool for communication and collaboration

• Definition of Done, a tool to document the current way of working

• Always try to drive the desire to change from within the teams

Speakers: Johan Nordin, Christophe Achouiantz

Kind: Experience Report

Timeslot: Tuesday, 10:45

Level: Basic


Kanban Blitz vs. the Slow Rider

I want to share my experiences of introducing Kanban, Lean and the background of that to different organizations in my organization, ranging from

  • my very own company and there on all levels (the sloooow rider) to
  • a very small sister company which got infected and enthusiastic by those ideas in no more tan 90 minutes (the Blitz) and
  • a Site Ops department which is not that enthusiastic but where the implementation has shown drastic effects right away.

The differences in the adoption - in those very closely related organizations - are so drastic that I would like to share the effects and my learnings in this session.

Speaker: Markus Andrezak

Kind: Pecha Kucha

Timeslot: Tuesday, 11:45

Level: Basic

 

Kanban Weak Spots

Kanban is considered very light-weight yet very effective method helping teams to organize their work and make their flow effective but most importantly to foster continuous improvement. Cost of introducing Kanban is very low and usually first effects of its implementation show up pretty quickly. However it doesn't mean that Kanban will survive in any environment. The method has some weak spots, which a team should take care of, otherwise there can be little value of introducing it.
Addressing potential issues related to Kanban implementation is as crucial to its success as knowing its strengths. It is also very important to plan for those risks so a team can get much value out of introducing them method.
The presentation discusses a number of different Kanban weak spots, showing their negative effects and advising how they can be avoided which helps teams to make improvements fostered by Kanban sustainable.
Both: problems and solutions are based on real-life stories of teams facing issues connected with adopting Kanban.

Speaker: Pawel Brodzinski

Kind: Session

Timeslot: Tuesday, 15:30

Level: Intermediate

 

Kanban and the Importance of Equanimity: Navigating politics and data aversion at the BBC

Drawing from my experience and experiments in the Future Media division of the BBC as a Project Manager and Delivery Improvement Specialist, in this presentation I will be exploring how understanding the concept of equanimity might assist coaches, managers, practitioners and team members overcome issues such as politics and data aversion.

As Kanban is often used to visualise and expose a part of a system which is failing, it can sometimes evoke negative emotion. But the question is, in these scenarios, how do you ensure the best possible outcome?

In very basic terms, equanimity is generically defined in the western dictionary as: “Mental calmness, composure, and evenness of temper, especially in a difficult situation” . Eastern philosophy views it a little differently, for example Hinduism states that "equanimity is the concept of balance and centeredness which endures through all possible changes in circumstances" .

Perhaps focussing on helping coaches, managers and teams achieve a state of equanimity before and during Kanban implementation could help overcome issues such as politics and unexpected negative backlash – whilst still preserving enthusiasm for continuous improvement?

So, what is the concept of equanimity, how do we get it, and could we use it to strengthen and complement Kanban implementation...?

Speaker: Katherine Kirk

Kind: Experience Report

Timeslot: Monday, 11:45

Level: Basic

 

Keeping Promises with Predictability

This talk presents a very brief introduction to Statistical Process Control (SPC) charts. Control charts can be used to study variability in a system. Reducing variability makes for greater predictability. Customers prefer predictability on a 15 day promise over unpredictability on a 10 day promise. This is why Sr. execs want predictability more than just about anything else. A team can become more predictable by studying and then driving out variability in their process or system. As an added bonus, Control charts provide objective ammo to influence mgmt decisions that impact teams.

Speaker: Dominica DeGrandis

Kind: Pecha Kucha

Timeslot: Monday, 15:00

Level: Basic

 

Lean, Kanban, Jazz and Origami

What do Lean, Kanban, Jazz and Origami have in common... and where do they differ? In this presentation I will talk about important aspects of Lean and Kanban that I consider to be key to their success and to be what sets them apart form other approaches and methodologies such as Agile and Scrum, yet could be easily ignored. This is very important because ignoring them as Lean and Kanban gain popularity will result in failed adoption at organizations. I use Jazz and Origami as metaphors because they greatly facilitate the understanding of those key aspects. I will also be introducing the term Understanding Worker and the phrase Think Outside The Kanban Board.

Speaker: Dr. Masa K. Maeda

Kind: Session

Timeslot: Tuesday, 11:45

Level: Intermediate

 

Level demand, balance workload and manage schedule risk with Classes of Service

Whether we're dealing with small work items or whole projects, the impact of delay can vary enormously. Why then do we often pretend that we can manage all work in the same way? Classes of Service gives us a framework to describe what many good process managers do implicitly; making this explicit, we make available to teams the tools for better decision-making internally and for setting justifiable expectations externally.

Come to this tutorial session if you struggle to organise a workload that includes a mixture of hard deadlines (e.g. office relocation, business integration, product launch), urgent interruptions (support work), value-driven work (that helps acquire customers or save significant costs) and important but less urgent work behind the scenes (platform upgrades, improvement work). You will learn how to achieve better outcomes by:

  • Recognising work items according to risk profile
  • Designing work scheduling policies for Kanban-based systems
  • Agreeing system parameters and setting expectations

To help you apply concepts and techniques in context, each will be backed by real-world examples taken from organisations that vary widely in scale and style.

Speaker: Michael Burrows

Kind: Session

Timeslot: Monday, 16:45

Level: Expert

 

Not just maintenance - Key points for using Kanban in large-scale Product Development

While Kanban has a reputation for being the solution for the Service Delivery side of the IT world, it is highly applicable to classic Product/System Development as well.

Thru stories, boards and visibility charts from real AgileSparks clients we will see what works, what's irrelevant, what's missing, and how to fill the gaps.

We will discuss Classes of Service versus Classes of Treatment, Using Kanban to extend agile to the Product management world, Flow as a way to achieve agility even in the face of heavy testing requirements, and more.

Speaker: Yuval Yeret

Kind: Session

Timeslot: Monday, 15:45

Level: Intermediate

 

Pimp my Board! 10 ways to improve your Card Wall

Every Kanban System should be unique, and the Card Wall should be considered as the "individual footprint" of the team. In this talk I will make 10 practical suggestions how to make Card Walls more effective, more individual and more fun.

Speaker: Arne Roock

Kind: Pecha Kucha

Timeslot: tba

Level: Basic

 

Push or Pull - What really matters

Kanban and Scrum say, that implement pull in contrast to traditional approaches to software development that push.

In this short session I will try to provoke some thoughts about it. Does the approach really matter when it cames to push vs. pull? Or is it more a question of organizational culture. In my experiences from the last 10 years I would definitly say it is cultural. I have seen Kanban and Scrum systems working in push mode.

Speaker: Stefan Roock

Kind: Pecha Kucha

Timeslot: Monday, 15:00

Level: Beginner

 

Rightshifting and the Marshall Model

The Rightshifting Hypothesis: The prevailing collective mindset of a knowledge-work organisation comprehensively determines how effective it is, and moreover, how effective it can hope to become.

This session describes the different mindsets which pertain at different levels of organisational effectiveness, what work and life looks like across these different kinds of organisations, and practical approaches to transforming organisational effectiveness for the better, by transforming the prevailing mindset.

Speaker: Bob Marshall

Kind: Session

Timeslot: Tuesday, 11:45

Level: Beginner

 

 

Scaling Kanban - Deliver big projects with 10+ Teams and still sleep well

Achieving to setup a well working Kanban Team is one thing. Executing a big project (like the XING 4.0 Relaunch) with 20 person-years of effort and 10+ teams working simultaneously is something different.

In this session I would like to show how we did that, why we were able to sleep well the nights before and after the launch and what we learned for the future.

Topics (not final yet):

  • The boarders of self-organization in complex environments (10+ teams)
  • Alternatives to deliver big projects with Agile/Kanban Teams and how this effects the organizational and project setup
  • What we learned from delivering XING 4.0 and what we can recommend

Of course, this will be presented in a entertaining way :)

Speaker: Traian Kaiser

Kind: Experience Report

Timeslot: Monday, 16:45

Level: Basic

 

Selling Kanban

Kanban is a wonderful tool for improving the software development process, but it's useless unless you can sell the idea to marketing, sales teams, top management, clients, and development teams. In this session, I would like to share with the audience the ways in which I have successfully sold agile development teams on the idea of adopting a lean approach and how I continue to sell external clients including both major international corporations and small lean startups on the idea of a lean approach to building out their idea. I will illustrate practical ways in which to bring all the stakeholders on board.

Speaker: Paul Klipp

Kind: Session

Timeslot: Monday, 11:45

Level: Intermediate

 

Sin or Salvation - Using Kanban to Set up a Scrum Project

Scrum like most other agile methods is silent on the “fuzzy front end” - the early product creation activities that include market research, product planning, and prototyping and are commonly called “visioning.” What’s more, Scrum is not well suited to manage the visioning work: The various tasks are often only loosely related. They usually don’t require a closely-knit team to carry out the work “all at once” and to create work the results incrementally. Additionally, Scrum requires that each sprint develops a product increment -- a tangible step towards the final product that could be shipped.

In this talk I offer a simple solution for product managers and product owners: using Kanban to organise the visioning work. We introduce a Kanban board that helps product owners manage the visioning activities such as determining the target group, the needs to be addressed, the key product features, and a rough idea of how the software can be built. We discuss how the product lifecycle influences the visioning activities and the contents of the board, how the board helps create transparency about the visioning tasks and their progress, and how it facilitates collaboration and flow -- which don't necessarily happen when pet projects are employed to explore new ideas.

After this talk, attendees will understand how they can leverage Kanban to organise their visioning work and what the corresponding Kanban board looks like.

Speaker: Roman Pichler

Kind: Session

Timeslot: Monday, 15:00

Level: Intermediate

 

Software Kanban: chances and challenges within a large scale lean/agile product development process at SAP

Topics covered in the session:

  • Brief “setting the stage”: some facts and figures about SAPs lean/agile transformation; facts about the data we draw our observations and conclusions from (~10 teams trying Kanban, as of May 2011; until October we expect to see a growing demand and more Kanban implementations at SAP)
  • Lean core principles (empowered teams, continuous improvement, flow, decentralized control, rapid feedback cycles) as our company wide framework within which we establish an agile development process
  • Standard Scrum as our development process on team level
  • What made us consider Software Kanban as a helpful complementary approach: a) Scaling Scrum: on the level of what we call “Product Teams” (second or third level Product Owners with their team, driving the work in terms of product content for a bunch of Scrum teams), Scrum itself was found to be not the best way of organizing their work; b) Teams with a high amount of maintenance work (working on defect requests) sometimes have an issue with planning their work for a sprint, even if it is only a very short one; c) Similarly, service teams (e.g. for providing and running development infrastructure systems, test systems, etc.) found Scrum a little bit too rigid; d)We’ll also try Scrum with Kanban in lean/agile rollout teams
  • Kanban in the context of our development process: a) “standard” Kanban (as D. Anderson has suggested); b) Additions: “Kanban master”, stand-up meetings, retrospectives, normally Product Owner; c) Kanban has to fit into our overall development takt schedule (4 weeks; sometimes an issue, since you don’t commit to delivering something until a fixed date in Kanban, but you try and stay within your lead time ranges); d) Risk: don’t rush to Kanban (instead of Scrum) as the next fad. So we’re considering Scrum to be the standard process for software development teams, Kanban rather for the teams mentioned above
  • Kanban as a chance to bridge the gap between lean ideas/approaches coming from manufacturing and the application in lean product development
  • Outlook: Kanban as evolutionary approach to change; Kanban and Kaizen-culture
  • Delivery of the content: we’ll use ideas from the “4C” approach. The session will connect the participants to the topic (and to each other), there will be a rather short pure content section, we will provide room for practicing what has been covered in the session, and there will be some concluding or round-up activities for the session.

Speaker: Alexander Gerber

Kind: Experience Report

Timeslot: Monday, 15:45

Level: Basic

 

The Red Bead Experiment

In this session David Joyce will conduct Dr W. Edwards Deming's famous Red Bead Experiment. This classic learning tool helps illustrate the impact that an organisational "system", and traditional management approaches, can have on individuals in a software team. The experiment introduces many of Deming's ideas about management, including some of his 14 Points for Management and deadly management diseases. It also introduces the Statistical Process Control Chart and the principles of variation.

Speaker: David Joyce

Kind: Session

Timeslot: Monday, 15:45

Level: Beginner

 

The Science of Kanban

Science is the building and organising of knowledge into testable explanations and predictions about the world. Kanban is an approach which leverages many scientific discoveries to enable improved flow, value and capability. This session will explore some of science behind kanban, focussing on mathematics and brain science in particular, in order to explain the benefits of studying a system, visualising and limiting it, sensing its performance and learning in order to improve it. Attendees will gain a deeper understanding of why and how kanban systems work so that they can apply the thinking with their own teams and organisations.

Speaker: Karl Scotland

Kind: Session

Timeslot: Monday, 10:15

Level: Intermediate

 

What can traffic in Stockholm teach you about queuing theory?

In this session you will learn about queuing theory and Theory of  Constrains. By using real world examples of different traffic situations in Stockholm, illustrations and examples from Kanban boards you will see  the similarities between them. You will lean how you can apply Theory of  Constrains to find the bottleneck in your development process and how  you can use this to continuously improve your development process.

Speaker: Håkan Forss

Kind: Session

Timeslot: Monday, 15:00

Level: Intermediate

 

Who's afraid of the Big Bad Wall - Visual Management and Gemba Walks

While Kanban Boards, Scrum Boards and other types of Team Boards, provide great visualization at the team level, it is not necessarily what management wants to see. In lean we talk about the concept of going to the Gemba, the actual place where work takes place, but in software development it is hard to decide what the Gemba is and how to do a Gemba walk. In this presentation we will talk about extending the visualization offered by team boards, to create complete visual walls for tracking the state of projects. We will further see how these Visual Boards can be the basis for implementing Gemba and Waste walks in the software development and in IT.

Speaker: Inbar Oren

Kind: Session

Timeslot: Monday, 11:45

Level: Intermediate

 

Why Kanban fits the Jimdo company culture

Jimdo is an online website builder that enables anyone to create a website in minutes. We have implemented Kanban company-wide, which has in turn led to some interesting results. While attending devopsdays in 2010, we became fascinated by the concept of Kanban, and quickly began implementing it in the Jimdo development team. It was not long before Fridel caught the 'Kanban bug', too, and began to 'kanbanize' the entire company. This talk will give a brief overview of how we are continuously improving our business processes, communication and culture using Kanban.

  • The dark days before Kanban
  • The evolution of our Kanban implementation (from dev-team to all other teams (marketing, designers, support-team, country management and even operations
  • How bad handwriting led us to develop a Kanban printer app and integrate it into our ticket system
  • The cultural aspect of Kanban, and what it means for Jimdo
  • Using a large-scale value-stream map for synchronizing teams, increasing transparency and promoting systems thinking

Speakers: Fridtjof Detzner, Sönke Rümpler

Kind: Experience Report

Timeslot: Tuesday, 15:00

Level: Basic